Knitting Techniques

How to Knit Short Rows Part 1 – Wrap & Turn

This post is the first half of a two-part tutorial on how to work short rows in knitting. While it is written specifically as support for my face mask pattern (you can grab a copy for yourself here if you would like), this knowledge can be easily integrated for use in other projects as well. Please note that the face mask is worked in k1, p1 ribbing, so this tutorial shows the short rows worked in k1, p1 ribbing also.

You can watch a video version of this tutorial immediately below, or scroll down for written step by steps with accompanying photos…

Short Rows Part 1 – Wrap & Turn:

Step 1: Work across your row until you reach the stitch you will wrap…

Step 2: Bring yarn between the needles, to the front…

Step 3: Slip the next stitch purlwise, from the left needle onto the right needle…

Step 4: Bring yarn between the needles, to the back…

Step 5: Turn work {keeping yarn to the front after the turn}…

Step 6: Slip the stitch purlwise, from the left needle onto the right needle…

Step 7: Bring yarn between the needles, to the back of the work…

Step 8: Wrap & Turn complete!
Continue working in pattern {k1, p1 ribbing in this case} until your next wrap & turn, you reach the end of the row, or you’re ready to work Part 2: Pick up & Knit!

Knitting, patterns

Hand Knit Face Mask Pattern

I’m excited today to share with you all my new pattern for: a hand knit face mask!

Since I feel strongly that an effective face mask design needs to fit comfortably on most face types/sizes, “stretchy” and “adaptable” are important key concepts embodying this project. To this end, and for utmost comfort and wash-ability, I recommend using cotton yarn. You’ll need one skein (100 yards/91 meters) in a sport weight. I used, from my stash, Knit Picks Shine Sport, which comes in many gorgeous colors! Any sport weight cotton yarn that you have in your stash will work great too!

A tight gauge is created by using relatively thicker yarn paired with small/tiny needles and used in combination with 1×1 ribbing to create a dense fabric. However, if you wish, your mask may also be layered with a handkerchief folded and placed inside, or worn over another mask to provide additional coverage.

Short rows are utilized to provide shaping and contour to the mask. There are links on my Resources & Tutorials page to two short video tutorials I made for you about how to work short rows, specifically in this pattern. I’ll also be writing a blog post about how to work short rows later on. {If you’d like to be notified when I publish new posts, just click on the Follow button at the right side of the page and enter your email address.}

Finish your mask with simple i-cord ear loops or choose to make ties instead for a more adjustable fit.

I want to encourage us all to be effective with our face mask(s) by remembering that simply wearing a face mask, whether sewn or hand knit, will not guarantee that a person remains uninfected. Rather, the point of the mask is to reduce the range of possibly infected droplets coming from our own nose and mouth as we breathe and speak; and to remind us to keep our hands away from our nose and mouth (and face in general). In these ways, face masks are a great tool for protecting both others and ourselves.

I hope you enjoy my new pattern as much as I’ve enjoyed creating it! You can grab your copy here!*

~Sarah